The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Volume 1, July 1897 - April, 1898

34 Texas Historical Association Quarterly.

EDITORS AND NEWSPAPERS OF FAYETTE COUNTY.
JULIA LEE SINKS.
The first newspaper established in Fayette county was called
"The La Grange Intelligencer," published by James P. Longley,
and edited by Wm. P. Bradburn, a gentleman of Nashville, Tenn.,
who had lived sometime in Mexico.
Through the influence of James K. Polk, a friend of the family,
he received the appointment of midshipman in the United States
Navy, on board the old "Constitution." His uncle, General Brad-
burn, who figured in the early history of Texas, having no children
of his own, persuaded him to resign his commission and accept his
adoption as son and heir. Sudden death overtook the uncle before
his affairs were legally adjusted in favor of the nephew, and the
property passed into other hands. So Mr. Bradburn came to Texas,
like many others, to seek fortune, and "The La Grange Intelli-
gencer" was established by James P. Longley, in part to give him
business, and in part to support General Burleson for the Presi-
dency.
The paper did not come up to their expectations, and Mr. Brad-
burn removed to Louisiana, and settled in New Orleans, where he
officiated at times as assistant editor of the New Orleans Tropic,
Picayune, and Bulletin, so I am informed by his relatives.
In 1848, when political strife was running high, he was solicited
by prominent men of Iberville parish to edit the Southern Sentinel,
which, under his guidance, became a great favorite. He still owned
and edited that paper when he died, leaving an estate valued at
$50,000.
The next person who edited the La Grange paper was a legal
gentleman, Fields, who had very little editorial acumen. In fact,
this editor of ours had hardly found his place in life. It was told
of him that in the San Saba fight under Colonel Moore he stood be-
hind a tree to shoot, and the tree was too small for the man, or the
man was too large for the tree. In turning to load his gun, an un-
lucky shot hit him in the back. Enraged at this irony of fate, he
lost all fear, and in stamping and cursing he ended this day of mar-

Texas State Historical Association. The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Volume 1, July 1897 - April, 1898. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101009/. Accessed September 3, 2014.