The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Volume 5, July 1901 - April, 1902

Book Reviews and Notices.

255

is not greatly to be blamed for insisting upon the demands which
forced the revolution into being: there was a small but very active
war party in Texas throughout 1835, and it was natural for Mexico
to fall into the error of confounding them with the whole popula-
tion. The principal cause of the conflict is to be sought in the
mutual distrust of the two peoples. The documents from which
the paper was prepared will be published in succeeding issues of
the Publications. They will form a very important contribution
to Texas history.
In this number Miles White, Jr., concludes his article on Henry
Baker and Descendants. Dr. Curry contributes a very interesting
review of John Christopher Schwab's The Confederate States of
America, 1861-1865. There is an excellent editorial appreciation
of Prof. Herbert B. Adams; and a suggestive review of Canada's
Work for History. Besides these, there are numerous book reviews
and notices.
Pleading in the District and County Courts of Texas. By John
C. Townes, LL. D., Professor of Law, University of Texas. (Aus-
tin, Texas: Published by the author. 1901. Pp. xvi, 525.)
One of the benefits expected from the founding of the University
Law School was the opportunity that would be given to those
chosen as professors to comprehensively study the distinctive fea-
tures of Texas jurisprudence and to present to the profession, in
permanent form, the matured results of their researches and reflec-
tions in this field. The volume on Pleading in the DistriCt and
County Courts of Texas is the first fruit of this kind that has come
from Professor Townes' connection with that institution. The
subject selected is of general interest to every practitioner and has
not heretofore met with the systematic treatment that has been
desired. There was no danger, therefore, in this day of digest-
making and encyclopedic learning, that a conscientious attempt to
present that branch of the law in a more instructive and inviting
form would meet with an unfavorable reception.
The work is what the profession had a right to expect from such
a source-a lucid law treatise on philosophic lines. The book is
not, as is so frequently the case, "a mere compilation of scattered
instances," nor a collection of disconnected and apparently arbi-
trary rules, but the outcome of an earnest effort to search out the

Texas State Historical Association. The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Volume 5, July 1901 - April, 1902. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101021/. Accessed August 31, 2014.