The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Volume 6, July 1902 - April, 1903

THE QUARTERLY
OF THE
TEXAS STATE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION.
Vol. VI. APRIL, 1903. No. 4.
The publication committee and the editor disclaim responsibility for views expressed by
contributors to the Quarterly.
THE DISTURBANCES AT ANAHUAC IN 1832.
EDNA ROWE.
In her narrow prejudice, Mexico pursued a policy towards her
colonists in Texas which finally led to open revolt. She first offered
liberal encouragement to colonization by the national colonization
laws of January 4, 1823, and August 18, 1824, which were followed
up by the State of Coahuila and Texas in its colonization law of
March 24, 1824. These laws led to a rapid influx of immigrants,
especially from the United States. Realizing the advantage the
acquisition of Texas would be to her, the United States government
instructed its minister at Mexico, Mr. Poinsett, in 1825, in 1827,
and in 1829 to make propositions to the Mexican government for
the purchase of all or a part of Texas. A jealousy of the views of
the United States and a fear of the growing strength of the colon-
ists in Texas drove Mexico to pass the famous law of April 6,
1830.1 The national colonization law of August 18, 1824, had pro-
vided, in Article 7, that "Until after the year 1840, the general
congress shall not prohibit the entrance of any foreigner, as a
colonist, unless circumstances shall require it, with respect to the
individuals of a particular nation."' In 1830, the Mexican general
1Henry Austin to Stephen F. Austin, July 2, 1830. Austin Papers.
2Holley, Texas (1833), 203.

Texas State Historical Association. The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Volume 6, July 1902 - April, 1903. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101028/. Accessed September 1, 2015.