The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Volume 7, July 1903 - April, 1904

THE QUARTERLY
OF THE
TEXAS STATE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
VOL. VII. JANUARY, 1904. No. 3.
The publication committee and the editor disclaim responsibility for views expressed by
contributors to the Quarterly.
ADJUSTMENT OF THE TEXAS BOUNDARY IN 1850.
W. J. SPILLMAN.
After the adoption of the Missouri compromise, there remained
to the South only the limits of Florida and Arkansas and the ter-
ritory extending west from the latter to the Spanish possessions for
the expansion of hpr "peculiar institution." From the northern
side of the compromise line stretched an imperial domain to the
furthermost boundary of the United States, dedicated to freedom
by that famous bill. The North found an outlet for its restless 4
population in this immense sweep of territory, acquired by the pur-
chase of Louisiana; but the creation of new political centers by this
tide threatened to disturb again the equilibrium between the North
and the South. The coils of free-soilism seemed at that time to be
gradually closing around the area appropriated to the slave-holding ,
States. Even throughout Mexico, which stood in the way of any \
possible future expansion toward the west, that form of servitude
permitted by the Southern States was abolished in 1829. Only in
the department of Texas, then being settled by colonists from ihe
South, had this decree been left inoperative.'
After the Fredonian revolt (1826-1827), the Mexicans regarded
with serious apprehension the settlement of Texas by the Anglo-
Americans, a race differing from them in origin, habits, religion,
and political training. To frustrate any further attempt to sepa-

1Garrison. Texas, 173.

Texas State Historical Association. The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Volume 7, July 1903 - April, 1904. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101030/. Accessed March 5, 2015.