The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Volume 7, July 1903 - April, 1904

THE QUARTERLY
OF THE
TEXA STATE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION.
V-ol-:VIf OCTOBER, 1903. No. 2.
The publication committee and the editor disclaim responsibility for views expressed by
contributors to the Quarterly.
THE CHEROKEE INDIANS IN TEXAS.'
ERNEST WILLIAM WINKLER.
I. THE CHEROKEE LAND QUESTION.
1. ORIGIN OF THE CHEROKEE CLAIMS.
Rather than be compelled to make peace and acknowledge the
sovereignty of the United States, and be brought in contact with
the civilization of the Anglo-Americans, a number of Cherokee
Indians, belonging principally to what was known as the hunter
class, at the close of the American Revolution abandoned their
ancient villages "in the wild and picturesque region where the
present States of Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, and the Carolinas
join one another," and removed to the territory of their friend and
ally2 Spain, settling on White River in Louisiana. As the Ameri-
can settler encroached upon their lands in the East, families and
small parties of dissatisfied Cherokees would join their brethren in
the West. After the United States purchased Louisiana, a larger
party of these Indians thought it best to obtain the consent of the
president previous to their removal;" this and similar requests sug-
gested the policy of the United States of removing all the Indians
west.4 By the end of 1819 about six thousand Cherokees lived
'An extension of a thesis presented for the M. A. degree at the University
of Texas.
2Ccrondelet on the Defenoe of Louisiana, 1794. American Historical
Review, II 478.
8American State Papers. Indian Affairs, II 125, 129.
'Schooleraft, Arohives of Aboriginal Knowledge, VI 402.

Texas State Historical Association. The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Volume 7, July 1903 - April, 1904. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101030/. Accessed July 10, 2014.