The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Volume 13, July 1909 - April, 1910

Reminiscences of the Texas Revolution.

REMINISCENCES OF THE TEXAS REVOLUTION1
ANDREW A. BOYLE
On the seventh day of January, 1836, at San Patricio de las
Nueces, I enlisted in'Captain Westover's battery (the first com-
pany of regular artillery in the Texas army). Our command was
soon after ordered to Goliad, where it was incorporated with the
forces commanded by Colonel Fannin. Colonels Bowie and
Crockett,2 then in command of the Alamo, sent a courier to Colo-
nel Fannin in the latter part of February, asking him for rein-
forcements. A hundred men3 were at once detailed, and had
crossed the San Antonio river on their way to the assistance of the
doomed garrison, when they were recalled on account of a report
brought in by a scout named "Comanche," of the advance of the
Mexican army under General Urrea, toward San Patricio. The
main body of the enemy, under Santa Ana, had marched directly
from Laredo upon San Antonio. Our commander, by the advice
of "Comanche," determined to march to San Patricio, leaving one
company in garrison at Goliad. The character of the scout was
notoriously bad, and Colonel Fannin was informed of the fact,
but gave no heed to the warning, although two of us volunteered
to go to San Patricio and ascertain the truth of the report. Three
days' rations were distributed, and everything was in readiness to
commence the march the next morning, when an American named
'These recollections of the Texas revolution were dictated by Andrew A.
Boyle in 1870, just before his death, to his daughter, Mrs. W. H. Workman.
For the manuscript THE QUARTERLY is indebted to his granddaughter,
Miss Gertrude Dardin Workman. Although Mr. Boyle's memory of details
was inaccurate, the paper is important in two particulars: (1) it adds
another witness to the list of Texan participants who have unanimously
testified that Fannin did not surrender at discretion, as General Urrea
claimed, and (2) it gives a first hand account of the execution of the
wounded prisoners at Goliad.
"The regulars at the Alamo were commanded by Travis, the volunteers
by Bowie. Crockett held no official position.
8Contemporary statements place this number between three and four
hundred men. See letters of Captain John Sowers Brooks (THE QUAR-
TERLY, IX, 179, 181, 183, 191) and Dr. Bernard's Journal in A Com pre-
hensive History of Texas, 1, 616.

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Texas State Historical Association. The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Volume 13, July 1909 - April, 1910. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101051/. Accessed July 9, 2014.