The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 16, July 1912 - April, 1913

The Southwestern Historical Quarterly

NOTES AND FRAGMENTS
TIHE WHEREABOUTS OF SAKi HOUSTON IN 1834.-Historians
and biographers have been puzzled as to the whereabouts of Hous-
ton in 1834. Lester in The Life of Sam Houston, which appeared
anonymously in 1855, gives no events in his life between the con-
vention at San Felipe de Austin in 1833 and the military affairs
of 1835; pp. 65-70 cover the period. Yoakum, History of Texas
(1856), I, 311, discusses the part he played in the San Felipe
meeting; nothing farther is given until events in 1835; see I,
328, 350. Crane, Life and Select Literary Remains of Sam Hous-
ton of Texas (1885), I, 49-54, shows the same deficiency, as does
Bruce, Life of General Houston (1901), 85-93. Williams, Sam
Houston and the War of Independence in Texas (1895), 92-93,
does worse than the rest for he garbles the story by placing events
of 1835 in 1834. Garrison, Texas (1903), 195-196, makes this
guarded statement, "Sam Houston, who seems to have left Texas
soon after the convention of 1833, and to. have returned just
previous to the consultation [1835], and who was a delegate from
Nacogdoches, offered a resolution instructing the committee to
declare in favor of the constitution of 1824." Barker, Jackson
and the Texas Revolution in The American Historical Review, XII,
802-803, says: "He did attend the Convention of April, 1833,
and the Constitution there adopted for the proposed state of Texas
. . was largely his work. But his life is a blank to history
for the next two years, and it is not till past the middle of 1835,
when the revolution was well under way, that we find him at
Nacogdoches, speaking at a public meeting. .. . The writer
has examined hundreds of letters and public documents, both
Texan and Mexican, on the development of the revolution, has
collected with few exceptions the proceedings of all the public
meetings and revolutionary committees, and has found nowhere a
single reference to General Houston."
The last writer who has added his testimony is Justin H.
Smith, The Annexation of Texas, which work appeared in 1911.
On page 28 he says, "Let us look now at Houston. He first be-
came prominent in Texan Affairs at the head of a committee
appointed to draw a State Constitution, the acceptance of which

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 16, July 1912 - April, 1913. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101058/. Accessed September 21, 2014.