The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 17, July 1913 - April, 1914

The Southwestern Historical Quarterly

plaints against himself. This is especially true of his campaigns
in the Valley in 1864 and 1865. It is in fact hardly necessary to
show that he fought against tremendous odds both of men and re-
sources, and that it was necessary at times for him to assume the
offensive against superior forces if he was to accomplish what Gen-
eral Lee desired. It is interesting to note that he had no very
high opinion of Sheridan, whose reputation was largely based upon
this Valley campaign, and attributes his escape "from utter annihi-
lation [at Winchester] to the incapacity of my opponent." The
rout of his army at Cedar Creek, he attributes chiefly to the demor-
alization of his troops by their plundering of the captured Federal
camp. Even here, Sheridan showed no vigor in pursuit.
General Early avows his own responsibility for the burning of
Chambersburg which was in partial retaliation for the devastations
wrought by the Union armies. He shows considerable feeling in
denying the charges of "rebel atrocities," particularly concerning
the treatment of prisoners, and describes vividly the hardships and
suffering of the southern people both at home and in the field.
Perhaps the publication of these memoirs will add little to the
knowledge of the critical student of military science, but they are
interesting reading and do much to clear Early's name from some
of the charges of incapacity so freely indulged in by certain writers
of military history.
CHASE. W. RAMSDELL.
Dr. William Le Roy Broun, compiled by Thomas L. Broun,
assisted by Bessie Lee Broun and Sally F. Ordway. (New York:
The Neale Publishing Company, 1912. Pp. 247.)
William Le Roy Broun, was the first professor of mathematics
in the University of Texas, and was one of the eight distinguished
men who formed the first faculty of the University, 1883-84. Upon
the resignation of Professor Mallet, the first Chairman of the Fac-
ulty (the University had no president until 1896), Professor Broun
was elected Chairman, but owing to. the death of his wife and be-
cause of friends and relatives in Alabama, he resigned to become,
as the event proved, the highly successful president of the Alabama
Polytechnic Institute (A. and M. College) from 1884 to his death
in 1902. This account of him compiled by three of his children

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 17, July 1913 - April, 1914. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101061/. Accessed August 28, 2014.