The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 18, July 1914 - April, 1915

The Southwestern Historical Quarterly

handling Californiana, has set himself an impracticable sort of
limitation, and has not followed his scheme consistently. A bib-
liography of Californiana is still needed, which shall include many
or most of the items which Mr. Cowan has discarded. The official
documents will form a supplement or a separate volume, for these
items are not so fully listed nor so easy of access as they ought
to be. So also may the local literature and works relating to
other geographical units be separately listed, but the person who
essays a line of cleavage will have a harder task than that entailed
in making one exhaustive list.
The bibliographical notes in the present volume are of chief
interest from the collector's point of view. They add much to
the interest of the books described, by way of information which
is not ordinarily contained in a bibliography.
The style of printing and binding is handsome. There are a
few errors in typography and spelling not mentioned in the list
of errata. The price of $20 asked for the book is exorbitant, and
deckled edges are a nuisance in a book of reference.
HERBERT L. PRIESTLEY.
The Establishment of State Government in California, 1846-1850.
By Cardinal Goodwin, M. A. (New York: The Macmillan Com-
pany. 1914. Pp. xiv, 359. $2.00.)
California history has frequently suffered at the hands of its
friends. Too often its facts, interesting enough in all conscience
in themselves, have been exaggerated into a sort of fictitious
romance, or perverted to coincide with preconceived notions or
opinions. With neither of these defects can Mr. Goodwin's book
be charged, and one welcomes it, therefore, with a sense of decided
satisfaction.
The division of the work into three parts renders it convenient
for ready use. The first of these, after a brief summary of early
American influence in California and a review of the conquest,
carries the discussion down through the establishment of military
rule to the problems created by the influx of the gold seekers and
the call and organization of the constitutional convention which
these rendered necessary. The second deals with the work of
this convention and of the chief questions confronting it. While

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 18, July 1914 - April, 1915. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101064/. Accessed July 23, 2014.