The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 19, July 1915 - April, 1916

The Southwestern Historical Quarterly

perspective of the State's history. It is not, and does not pur-
port to, be, a history of the di fferent counties of the State, nor
does it purport to be a history of the State, except in so far as
that is involved in county names" (Preface). This plan ex-
plains why Nolan is included in Chapter I; it is to that period
that his connection with Texas history belongs. Similarly
Stephens and Young are grouped in Chapter XV with other names
that became prominent during the Civil War. Had they died
before the Civil War. their sketches would have been placed in
some other group. Atascosa, Bosque and other Spanish names
excluded from Chapter I are included in Chapter XVII because
they are geographical terms. This plan of the -book also invali-
dates the remark about the length of the book's title, and the
date of the naming of a county may safely be disregarded.
The sketches are good. The introductory paragraphs are good.
The grouping of the sketches into chapters is successful in some
chapters. In the application of this plan to. all the sketches, how-
ever, results are produced which in the opinion of the reviewer
will always make it a question whether the advantages of such an
arrangement overbalance the disadvantages.
E. W. WINKLER.
Davy Crockett. By William C. Sprague. (New York: The
iMacmillan Company, 1915. ["True Stories of Great
Americans" series.] $0.50.)
This is a truly interesting narrative oif the man whose name is
emblazoned upon the history pages of Texas and whose memory
is perpetuated through his glorious death in the Alamo,.
The book, however, in one or two places, is at variance with
events recorded in Texas history. It is regrettable that the author
says, on page 146, that "in 1833 the Americans in Texas decided
to strike for independencee" because, according to Texas history,
they didn't. During that year the Texans took steps to obtain
separation from Coahuila in order to establish a, separate govern-
ment, but no attempt was made to. secure independence from
Mexico. Without mentioning dates, the author, a little farther
down on the same page, says, "The revolution was now on. The
Americans organized a government; Henry Smith was elected

318

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 19, July 1915 - April, 1916. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101067/. Accessed April 16, 2014.