The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 24, July 1920 - April, 1921

Book Reviews and Notices

pal Surveyor was read and the appointment made subject to such
special regulations as may hereafter be adopted.
A petition from Laughlin icLaughlin praying that the title for
Town Lot No. - be made to John M. Allen, for the reasons set
forth in the petition--prayer granted.
[p. 21] A petition from S. A. Brown was presented read, and
rejected by the unanimous vote of the body.
BOOK REVIEWS AND NOTICES
Kino's Historical Memoir of Pimeria Alta: A Contemporary Ac-
count of the Beginnings of California, Sonora, and Arizona, by
Father Eusebio Francisco Kino, S. J., Pioneer Missionary Ex-
plorer, Cartographer, and Ranchman, 1683-1711. By Herbert
Eugene Bolton, Ph. D. (Cleveland, The Arthur H. Clark Co.,
1919. 2 vols. Pp. 379, 329.)
The history and bibliography of the Spanish Southwest has
been notably enriched by the publication of Professor Bolton's two
volumes on Father Kino.. The author and editor has rescued from
oblivion what may be justly characterized as one of the most val-
uable sources in the field of which he is the acknowledged pioneer
and master, and has given to the scholarly world a final and au-
thoritative picture of the great missionary whose name will always
be intimately associated with the northward expansion of New
Spain. "Bolton's 'Kino'" will doubtless become as well known a
phrase as is "Parkman's 'La Salle'," "Fiske's 'Las Casas'" and
other similar works.
The major portion of this work consists of a carefully edited
translation of Father Kino's lost history known as "Favores Celes-
tiales." The original manuscript was discovered by Professor
Bolton during his researches in the Mexican archives. There had
been a few vague references made and much speculation indulged
in by earlier writers as to the existence of a formal history by
Father Kino, but Professor Bolton was the first to locate and defi-
nitely identify such a work. The text of the translated manu-
script comprises a total of 567 pages in the two volumes, and
contains Kino's personal account of his labors in the region of
Pimeria Alta, roughly corresponding to present northern Sonora
and southern Arizona.
In the sixty-page introductory essay that precedes the text Pro-

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 24, July 1920 - April, 1921. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101078/. Accessed April 20, 2014.