The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 26, July 1922 - April, 1923

THE
SOUTHWESTERN HISTORICAL
QUARTERLY
VOL. XXVI APRIL, 1923 No. 4
The pubication commttee and the editors disclaim responsbzlzty for views expressed by
contributors to THE QUARTERLY
NEW LIGHT ON PATTIE AND THE SOUTHWESTERN
FUR TRADE
JOSEPH J. HILL,
Bancroft Library, University of California.
James Ohio Pattie and his father, Sylvester Pattie, with six
companions arrived in California, overland from New Mexico,
early in the spring of 1828, one of the first Anglo-American par-
ties to reach California by an overland route. Four years pre-
vious to this date, in the summer of 1824, they had left Missouri
with a company of trappers and traders destined for the settle-
ments of New Mexico. The intervening period, from 1824 to
1828, had been spent in the Far Southwest, in trapping, trading,
and in mining. The elder Pattie had spent most of the period
in the last named occupation, whereas the son had spent most of
the time trapping.
One of the tantalizing things, however, about The Personal
Narrative of James Ohio Pattie is the lack of any information
concerning the leaders and members, other than himself and his
father, of the various trapping parties of which he was a member.
It seems strange that a person traveling some three or four thou-
sand miles with a company of trappers and attempting to give
an account of their activities on the journey should do so without
mentioning the name of a single one of the members of the party,
not even the leader. Pattle is even more exasperating than that.
In 1826 he left the Santa Rita copper mines with one company
and traveled down the Gila to the mouth of Salt River, where
all but three of that party were massacred. He then fell in with

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 26, July 1922 - April, 1923. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101084/. Accessed March 30, 2015.