The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 28, July 1924 - April, 1925

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

THE EXPEDITION OF PANFILO DE NARVAEZ
BY
GONZALO FERNANDEZ OVIEDO Y VALDEZ
EDITED BY IARBERT DAVENPORT
CHAPTER VI
In which ends the relation of these gentlemen, Alvar Nuiiez
C~beza de Vaca, Andres Dorantes and Alonso del Castillo, following
their difficult journey and the things they went through until they
arrived at a Christian village of the Government of Nueva Galicia.
The next day after Alonso del Castillo returned, he and his
companions, the Treasurer, Cabeza de Vaca, and Andres Dorantes,
started to meet the negro and his Indians, who gave them all they
had, consisting of danta (the animal called vaca as aforesaid) and
deer hides, bows and arrows, many gourds, and some beans, and
all this the Christians gave to the people that had brought them
there, who went back satisfied.
With the new Indians, although [these were] despoiled of their
belongings, they departed, and continued their journey to their
houses, which were five or six leagues from there on that river,
where they sowed.' But because of the many people that they had,
and the little and very rough land, it was little that they harvested.
They took them by that river upward to four groups of villages
they had. They had little to eat, and this was beans and pump-
kins and very little maize. Their way of cooking this was as
follows: they filled a gourd shell with water and threw into it
small stones previously heated in the fire, until the water boiled;
then they poured in the flour of the beans and threw more heated
stones over it, until the porridge was made, when they ate it.
There they told them that onward they had no more flour, nor
beans, nor anything else to eat for thirty or forty more days' jour-
ney forward, which was going from the region where the sun sets
toward the north, from where these Indians had to provide them-
selves, and bring those seed; that all the Indians they had to go
'They were at a settlement of Jumano Indians on the Rio Grande,
near the Conchos confluence.

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 28, July 1924 - April, 1925. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101087/. Accessed April 25, 2014.