The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 31, July 1927 - April, 1928

Committee on Texan Declaration of Independence

mitted to appoint such deputies as needed. The Senate unani-
mously rejected the nomination.138
Following the adjournment of the Convention in March, the
first mention of Gaines in sources that have been found to treat
of him, was on March 31, 1838. On this date, he proved before
the Land Commissioners of Sabine County that he arrived in
Texas in 1812 and was entitled, as a married man, to one labor
of land, under the usual requirements.1" April 10, he sold this
Headright Certificate, No. 484, to Susan Jackson "for fifty dollars
in hand paid." The sale was witnessed by F. T. Gaines, Chief
Justice of Sabine County, on the same date.140
He served as Senator from Sabine, Shelby, and Harrison dis-
trict, during the fourth, fifth, and sixth congresses of the Republic.
At the end of the regular session of the sixth congress, he resigned.
Later, he moved to Bastrop County, and from there was lured to
California by the gold rush. He made that state his home and
is believed to have died in Oakland, California, in 1855.1E'
1asE. W. Winkler (ed.), Seoret Journals of the Senate of The Republio
of Texas, 1836-1845, 48-49.
-"'"File 4, Sabine 1st class. James Gaines. 1 Labor. General Land
Office, Austin.
'0"File 4, Sabine Co.-lst Class. Sabine, Shelby, and Harrison dis-
trict." 'General Land Office.
'41Fulmore, The History and Geography of Temas As Told by County
Names, 76; Dixon, The Men Who Made Texas Free, 306.

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 31, July 1927 - April, 1928. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101088/. Accessed August 28, 2014.