The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 32, July 1928 - April, 1929

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

TADEO ORTIZ DE AYALA AND THE COLONIZATION OF
TEXAS, 1822-1833
TRANSLATION'
I
EDITED BY EDITH LOUISE KELLY AND MATTIE AUSTIN HATCHER
INTRODUCTION
Tadeo Ortiz, or Sim6n Tadeo Ortiz as he sometimes signed him-
self, was a creole of Guadalajara. He was dominated by two great
purposes, the establishment of Mexican independence and the pro-
tection of the integrity of the national domain by the formation
of colonies to develop unsettled regions and to serve as barriers
against foreign aggression. From certain intercepted letters, which
he attempted to send by stealth to the Mexican revolutionary lead-
ers, his services to the cause of freedom can be ascertained.
According to his own story, he left Mexico City, where he had
been studying Latin and philosophy, and in 1810 embarked at
Vera Cruz for the purpose of studying in Europe. However, the
Napoleonic wars interfered with his plans; and, upon the death
of his father, he determined to return to Mexico, where the revo-
lution had broken out under Hidalgo. He was denied permission
to leave Spain and, therefore, sailed secretly for the United States
with the intention of entering Mexico through Texas and the other
'The first draft of the translation was made by the following students
in the Spanish classes of Miss Edith Kelly: Marshall Abernathy, John
Aldridge, J. C. Bowen, Francis Burt, Charles Devall, Sam Glass, Eliza-
beth Griffin, H. A. Hodges, Stanley Hornsby, F. B. Lombard, Herndon
Mabry, Velma Martin, Truett Patterson, M. H. Rose, Vernon Schawe,
Leonard Shropshire, Merritt Steger, Sarah Thaxton, Carey Thompson,
Ola Tillery, George Vick, Ted Weaver, E. Lee Wysong.
The work was largely an experiment in broadening the viewpoint of
the students by an introduction to historical documents intimately con-
nected with vital problems of the Southwest and to a vocabulary some-
what typical of the region. The transcripts, copied from the originals
in the Archivo General de Mexico, were imperfect and the writer's style
was exceedingly involved. However, the interest of the students was
gratifying and the results were satisfactory. The first draft was used
by the editors for the present translations. Grateful acknowledgments
are due Mr. C. E. Castaieda, Latin-American Librarian, and Mr. Donald
L. Joseph, Adjunct Professor of Romance Languages, for aid in the trans-
lation of particularly obscure passages in Spanish and French, respectively.

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 32, July 1928 - April, 1929. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101089/. Accessed October 1, 2014.