The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 34, July 1930 - April, 1931

THE
SOUTHWESTERN HISTORICAL
QUARTERLY
VOL. XXXIV. APRIL, 1931 No. 4
The publication committee and the editors disclaim responsibility for views expressed by
contributors to THE QUARTERLY
A BRIEF STUDY OF THOMAS J. RUSK BASED ON HIS
LETTERS TO HIS BROTHER, DAVID, 1835-1856
LOIS FOSTER BLOUNT
IV
Rusk and Houston
One of the first acquaintances that Thomas J. Rusk made in
Texas was Sam Houston, who was living in Nacogdoches at the
time of Rusk's arrival in Texas.x When Rusk took the oath of
allegiance to the Mexican government, Sam Houston was one of
the witnesses.2 The two men seem to have been attracted to
each other, and their acquaintance ripened into friendship. They
were closely associated in the revolutionary agitation in the sum-
mer of 1835. Rusk describes an early adventure:
"I remember that in 1835, shortly after I went to Texas, be-
ing at Nacogdoches, I was called on to attend one of these
"juntas" or conventions by the alcalde. Certain questions were
laid before us, and we were invited to express our opinion upon
them. I expressed mine very freely; and, after the meeting was
broken up, the alcalde ordered me to be taken to the calaboose;
and if there had not been more Americans present than Mexicans,
I should have been imprisoned for the expression of my opinion."8
But things were moving raipdly in Nacogdoches. On July 19
a meeting was held, with Frost Thorn presiding and T. J. Rusk
1M. James, The Raven, 199.
0C. B. Sterrett, Life of T. J. Rusk, 7-8.
"Congressional Globe, December 18, 1848, XX, 48.

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 34, July 1930 - April, 1931. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101091/. Accessed December 26, 2014.