The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 36, July 1932 - April, 1933

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

went with me to see her foster mother, who is very sick, and who
wants to see her before her Death-
Sunday the 19th no rain but cloudy- left Mr Berrys at 8 A. M.
met John Sparks near Attoyaque who gave me the gold Chain left
by me at Natchitochez last June- arrived at San Augustine at
4 P. M. Stopped with A. W. Canfield Esqr- paid him $24.00
being for advertizing the sale of Benigno Santos' Land for Taxes,
also Col Frost Thorn's Supscription to the Red Lander 3d Vol-
saw Mr and Mrs Deyoung and Daughters, all well took Coffee with
them had a lively chit chat, all agreable
Monday November the 20th fine weather, warm & a little
Cloudy- left San Augustin at 71 A. M. dined at Brown's arrived
at Sabine Town at 4 P. M. stopped with Judge Hotchkiss- the
Judge not at home, his Lady who has not seen Mrs S. in seven years
was very glad to see her, this is the second time I stop at this
House & the Judge is absent- at present Mrs H. tells me he is in
New Orleans
BOOK REVIEWS AND NOTICES
A Texas Ranger and Frontiersman: The Days of Buck Barry in
Texas, 1845-1906. Edited by James K. Greer. The
Southwest Press, 1932. Pp. xi, 254. Illustrations, maps.
Price, $3.50.
This autobiography of James Buckner Barry is another item
in the long and growing list of the Southwest Press. It is by
no means the least excellent on the list.
Of the eighteen chapters in the book, eleven deal more or
less with military affairs and Indian fighting, and seven relate
the author's experience in the more peaceful walks of life.
Barry was born in North Carolina in 1821 and came to Texas in
1845. He almost immediately joined the Texas Rangers under
Jack Hays, and when the Mexican War broke out, followed Hays
into Mexico. His account of the participation of the Rangers in
this war adds little to what is well known. It in no way com-
pares with the work of Samuel C. Reid. In fact, Barry appears
to depend in this part of his story on memory which had been
obscured by the passing of time. One who is familiar with the

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 36, July 1932 - April, 1933. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101093/. Accessed October 22, 2014.