The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 42, July 1938 - April, 1939

Book Reviews

turn with the Louisiana Territory, the NMissouri Territory, and
the Territory of Arkansas.
REx W. STRICKLAND.
College of Mines and Metallurgy.
The United States and the Disruption of the Spanish Empire,
1810-1822. A Study of the Relations of the United with
Spain and with the Rebel Spanish Colonies. By Charles
Carroll Griffin. Columbia University Studies in History,
Economics, and Public Law, No. 429. (New York: Co-
lumbia University Press, 1937. $3.75.)
This volume treats in survey fashion the relations of the United
States with Spain and her revolting colonies, 1810-1822. Manu-
script materials for the investigation come from the archives of
London, Paris, Simancas, Madrid, the State Department, Division
of Manuscripts, Library of Congress and New York Public Li-
brary. After a brief introduction touching U. S.-Spain relations
up to 1810, the author divides his subjects into 1) our relations
with the revolting colonies to 1815; 2) negotiations with Spain
over Florida, the western boundary of Louisiana, and neutrality
problems; 3) relations with the rebels; 4) the Adams-Onis Treaty
and its rati fiction; and 5) a chapter on recognition. A final
word is said in analysis of the factors influencing the historical
developments of the period.
There is value in a study that attempts to bring together vari-
ous significant data for a comprehensive view of the subject here
considered. Specific contributions stand out. Evidence is forth-
coming of the part our munitions industries played in the success
of the Wars for Independence. A broader indication is manifest,
hitherto little known, of the influence of our political ideas in
the minds of the revolutionary leaders. Significant data are pre-
sented touching the extent of privateering during the struggle and
the relation of this activity to the growth of American trade. New
light is thrown upon the relation of our westward expansion to the
revolutionary movements across the border.
Two ideas the writer projects need stressing. One is that the
Wars for Independence were "native movements." Too much
emphasis has been put upon foreign influence in bringing about
this vast upheaval. The other is that the antecedents of our rivalry

281

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 42, July 1938 - April, 1939. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101107/. Accessed July 30, 2014.