The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 42, July 1938 - April, 1939

Boole Reviews

liography, and index would make it somewhat easier to use, but
these slight deficiencies do not seriously impair its value as a
textbook. The Macmillan Company deserves commendation for
making Professor Chapman's splendid works available in such an
attractive and economical edition.
RICHARD A. JOHNSON.
A ugustana College.
A Century of Medicine in Texas. The Story of Medicine in Bexar
County, Texas. By Pat Ireland Nixon, M. D. (San Antonio:
Privately published through the Lancaster Press, Lancaster,
Pa., 1936. Pp. xvi, 405.)
Fifty-four years ago James D. Lynch's Bench and Bar of Texas
came off the press. What Lynch did for the legal profession,
Dr. Nixon has done for the medical profession, with the difference,
however, that he confined himself to a very small portion of
Texas. Some day the author's hope that another writer will under-
take to write the history of medicine in Texas will come true.
Then the worth of Nixon's book as a source will stand out again.
The author has divided his book into two parts of four and
seven chapters, respectively. The first part covers the period to
1900; the second comes up to the Texas centennial. There is an
almost equal balance of pages between the two parts, one hundred
ninety-two and one hundred eighty-nine, respectively. There are
three appendices containing the names of present and former
members and of the officers of the Bexar County Medical Society
since its founding in 1903. Thirty illustrations add materially to
the interest of the book.
Dr. Nixon writes with a very definite loyalty to his profession.
In his preface he says: "San Antonio has had its quota of doctors
who have spent their lives on the firing line. . . . It is to be
regretted that many of their names . . . are forgotten and it is
to be hoped that the records herein compiled will preserve for a
better fate the names of the doctors of the present generation."
He regrets that the soldier is long remembered and the doctor
soon forgotten and reminds the reader: "Travis, Bowie, Crockett
and Bonham sacrificed their lives and no one would deny them
the full measure of glory. But Pollard, Michison and Thomp-
son also made the supreme sacrifice and their names are seldom

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 42, July 1938 - April, 1939. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101107/. Accessed August 2, 2014.