The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 42, July 1938 - April, 1939

Bool Reviews

legend that Whitman traveled East in 1842-1843 to save Oregon
from the British. It would be a peculiarly stubborn mind now
that could seek to revive the legend that took such firm hold
of historical writers in the later years of the nineteenth cen-
tury. It was the Catholic church, not the British government,
that drove Whitman East. He went to beg for Protestant rein-
forcements against the aggressive Catholic missionaries. Whit-
man's connection with the great emigration of 1843 was fortuitous.
He had nothing to do with stimulating it; but he knew of its
preparation to trek in the spring, and hastened his return from
New York to travel with it and guide it.
Overland to the Pacific was conceived with originality and has
been edited and published in a thoroughly satisfactory manner.
It is not only scholarly, but interesting.
EUGENE C. BARKER.
The University of Texas.
Our First Great West, in Revolutionary War, Diplomacy and Poli-
tics. (How it Was Won in War and Politics under Vir-
ginia's Lead and under John Jay's in Diplomacy.) By
Temple Bodley. (Louisville, Kentucky: John P. Morton
& Co., 1938. The Filson Club Publications No. 36. Pp.
iv and 299. Appendices, maps, and illustrations.)
A frontispiece map of the Eastern half of the United States,
with the region in color, shows clearly the area encompassed by
this study: between the Alleghenies and the Mississippi, and from
the northern boundary of Florida to the Great Lakes. The period
of time covered is from the loss of New France to England in 1763
to the boundary settlements in the Treaty of Paris in 1783 which
gave the trans-Allegheny lands to the United Colonies. It is the
author's intent to emphasize the vast importance to American
history of the acquisition of this region. He points out that it has
been minimized or entirely overlooked by Eastern historians of the
Revolutionary period.
In an opening chapter entitled "Background," the author
summarizes more than a century and a half of French and Indian
occupancy, with detailed discussion of the Indian title to lands
wandered over by the various tribes, and of the passage of question-
able title to these lands. He rapidly explores the field of Indian

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 42, July 1938 - April, 1939. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101107/. Accessed April 20, 2014.