The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 42, July 1938 - April, 1939

Book Reviews

was published in the Columbia University Studies in History,
Economics, and Public Law, No. 295. That study was so well
received that Professor Brebner settled down to the arduous task
of marshalling the facts necessary for the writing of the history of
Nova Scotia for the period from 1760 to the close of the Ameri-
can Revolution.
The burden of the careful and extended work here reviewed is
to show that, although Nova Scotia was settled by many people
from New England, it remained loyal to Great Britain during
the American Revolution. During the seventeenth century Nova
Scotia was coveted by the English for its strategic location. In
1710 it was conquered by New Englanders during Queen Anne's
War and became an English possession by the treaty of Utrecht.
New England "stimulated and carried out the expulsion of the
Acadians in 1755" and settled twice as many of its own people
in the place of the Acadians.
Despite the large number of New Englanders in Nova Scotia,
settlers who had come from the hotbed of opposition in the colonies,
these people did not join the American Revolution but became the
"neutral Yankees of Nova Scotia."
Professor Brebner expresses the hope that "no one will have to
do the work over again," but why he also hopes "that this study
can be regarded as a fabric of hypotheses which interested readers
will modify in the light of their own knowledge and ideas" I do
not see. The main hypothesis is inescapable and conclusive, and
the extended documentation, showing as it does a large amount of
research, should be a deterrent to do the work again, even for one
who had a desire in that direction. Professor Brebner may rest
assured that his book is a useful book.
R. L. BIESELE.
The University of Texas.
The So-d-House Frontier, 1854-1890: A Social History of the
Northern Plains from the Creation of Kansas and Nebraska
to the Admission of the Dakotas. By Everett Dick. (New
York: D. Appleton-Century Company, 1937. Pages xx,
550. Bibliography, illustrations, and a map.)
In The Sod-House Frontier, Everett Dick has described anew
and in brilliant fashion the simple life of the frontiersman of

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 42, July 1938 - April, 1939. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101107/. Accessed September 22, 2014.