The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 43, July 1939 - April, 1940

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

American Problems of Today: A History of the United States
Since the World War. By Louis M. Hacker. (New York:
F. S. Crofts & Co. 1938. Pp. xiii, 354.)
Professor Hacker was well known for his historical writings
before he completed the volume here reviewed. He has added a very
good book to his list of books with American Problems of Today.
The book contains three parts and maintains a fair balance of
space between the first two, but the third part is about as long
as the other two together. The first part, entitled "The Golden
Twenties," deals with the politics involved in the election and
administrations of Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover; with such
leading legislative problems as the tariff, the merchant marine,
the railroads, the public debt and tax reduction, the care of the
war veterans, and the regulation of power; and with our relations
with the rest of the world on such matters as Pan-Americanism,
the peace movement, naval limitation, interallied debts and repa-
rations, and Russian relations. The second part is entitled "Im-
perial America in the Machine Age" and contains chapters on
capital and labor, the four outstanding problems of the twenties
and thirties, and life, letters, and art. The discussion of the problem
of economic imperialism is particularly informative and raises many
questions. The third part, entitled "America Fights Depression,"
has four chapters on capitalism in crisis, the change from an old
to a new deal, the New Deal agencies, and the progress of the
New Deal.
A bibliography of ten pages lists, first, the general works and
publications which are available for studying the period, and,
second, the more specific works on each of the ten chapters. The
index of ten pages is serviceable enough. The volume as a whole
speaks well for the author and publisher.
Special attention must be called to the discussion of the public
debt and tax reduction (pp. 32-34). In that connection the fol-
lowing bears quoting: "Secretary of the Treasury Mellon, aided
by Presidents Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover, reduced this burden
(the public debt of $24,061,000,000 in 1920) 33 per cent in the
decade of the twenties . .," that is from a per capita of $228.00
down to $134.00.
R. L. BIEsEE.
The University of Texas.

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 43, July 1939 - April, 1940. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101111/. Accessed October 21, 2014.