The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 43, July 1939 - April, 1940

Book Reviews

safely and with slight suffering. Except for the tragic loss of
Lieutenant Harrison, who was killed and scalped by a roving
band of Kiowas, one sick man left at Santa Fe, and three deser-
tions, Marcy's command, after a trip of 2,000 miles, remained
intact.
The Gold Seekers ordinarily formed semi-military organizations,
drew up rules, employed guides, and asked for Government mili-
tary escort, at first to Santa Fe and later all the way to Cali-
fornia. Many of the companies had trained journalists, Thomas
Falconer for instance, and thus their experiences could be written
up with great detail.
Footnotes throughout the book offer convincing evidence that
the author searched "through scores of libraries and thousands
of newspapers." He used and published the entire Report of
Captain Marcy, and he made extensive use of other official jour-
nals and reports, such as those of Lieutenants Abert, Michler,
Simpson and Whipple. Foreman's book suggests the possibilities
of future work in gleaning the columns of the thousands of news-
papers, personal letters and journals, and reports of various sorts
that yet remain to the diligent student. The University of Okla-
homa and Foreman are to be congratulated on the contents and
the format.
J. L. WALILER.
College of Mines and Metallurgy.
The Early Writings of Frederick Jackson Turner: With a List of
All His Works. Compiled by Everett E. Edwards. (Madi-
son: The University of Wisconsin Press, 1938. Pp. xi, 316.
$3.50. Frontispiece, bibliography, and appendix.)
It is safe to say that every former student of Turner's as well
as the thousands of others who have known and admired this great
scholar and his work will be deeply grateful for this book. It seems
particularly fitting that it should be published by the press of
the University of Wisconsin, the institution at which he spent
so many years of his life as a student and teacher. It is also very
appropriate that the preface is written by Louise P. Kellogg, an
early student of Turner's at Wisconsin where she was a member
of his first class in the history of the West, and that there should
be included as an introduction an essay called "Turner's Formative

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 43, July 1939 - April, 1940. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101111/. Accessed April 1, 2015.