The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 50, July 1946 - April, 1947

eaorge aNeerman Dealey
SAM ACHESON
GEORGE BANNERMAN DEALEY, newspaper publisher, civic
planner, was born on September 18, 1859, in Manchester,
England, the second son of George and Mary Ann (Nellins)
Dealey. Business misfortunes caused his parents to emigrate
in 1870, and they made the voyage to Texas on an old style
sailing vessel. Upon arrival in Galveston, an older brother,
Thomas W. Dealey, promptly went to work for the Galveston
News, but it was not until four years later that George Ban-
nerman Dealey began his notable and lengthy career with the
same firm, which had been founded during the days of the
Republic.
Meanwhile young Dealey's schooling, which had been spotty
in England, was equally intermittent in the Galveston of Recon-
struction days. For a time he attended Galveston's first free
public school, which had been established in 1870 under pro-
visions of the state constitution of 1869. Later he attended
night sessions of the Island City Business College. His educa-
tion, however, consisted chiefly of a series of childhood jobs
ranging from Western Union delivery boy to runner for a Ger-
man cotton firm during the Franco-Prussian War. He also
served on Sundays and Wednesday nights as bell ringer and
organ pumper for the Episcopal church in Galveston.
The future owner of the publishing firm began as an office
boy in the Galveston News on October 12, 1874, a date which
became increasingly significant in his life as his span of service
with one institution stretched out more than three score and
ten years to give him a place unique in the annals of journalism
throughout the English speaking world. The chief proprietor
of the News in those days was Willard Richardson, indomitably
independent editor who had started the newspaper in 1842.
Richardson had only recently been joined by Alfred H. Belo, a
Confederate colonel from North Carolina, who was to succeed
him as guiding force of the enterprise. From these two figures
and their chief associates young Dealey was to inherit the
ideals and business ethics which had enabled the News to sur-
vive pioneer difficulties and to emerge from the destruction of

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 50, July 1946 - April, 1947. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101117/. Accessed August 1, 2014.