The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 52, July 1948 - April, 1949

Book Reviews

message he reminded the audience not to overlook the need at
home for the Christian attitudes toward all racial minorities and
unfortunates of this earth. Dr. Dawson, reporting on the work
done by representatives of many church groups at the Confer-
ence of the United Nations at San Francisco, said:
We presented the delegates of the United Nations Conference with
certain statements of the Baptist position, particularly on religious
freedom. While the World Charter does not contain all the explicit
language for which we appealed, we rejoice that it does in three
separate provisions call for no discrimination on the grounds of
religion. For the first time in the history of the world does a guar-
antee of religious liberty appear in such a document.
The outline of Texas Baptist history has been condensed into
122 pages, while an appendix contains a pageant covering the
major developments of the same period in eight episodes. Minor
typograpical errors can be corrected in the next edition. Now
that the excellent outline is done, it would be unfortunate if
this historian of one of the large denominations does not have
the time to complete a detailed account.
ROBERT C. COTNER
The University of Texas
Wilson: The Road to the White House. By Arthur S. Link.
Princeton (Princeton University Press), 1947. Pp. xiii+528.
Illustrations, bibliography, index. $5.00.
A rare treat is spread before the inquiring and discerning stu-
dent of history and of human nature in this publication. As the
title indicates, the book deals with the formative years of a great
American president. Special emphasis is placed on the period
from 1902 to 1912 during which Woodrow Wilson served first
as president of Princeton University and then as governor of
New Jersey.
In that span of time, the man who was to lead our nation
during years fraught with responsibility changed perceptibly
from a theorist regarding matters of government into a top-
ranking politician and statesman. In that same period, Wilson's
innate adherence to an opinion once formed was tempered by
his experiences in high office to an unfortunate degree of brittle-

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 52, July 1948 - April, 1949. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101121/. Accessed September 16, 2014.