The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 53, July 1949 - April, 1950

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

changes in the edition of 1722. Just why he says in note 7 on
page 352 that Beverley is in error about the meeting of the House
of Burgesses (p. 48 says May, 1620o) and then in the note says the
burgesses first convened in August, 1619, when the actual meeting
date was July go, 1619 (see Wright, The Atlantic Frontier, 61),
is not clear to me. Neither is the spelling Yardley for Yeardley
clear (see ibid., 61).
The publication of this book is a worthwhile project. Old books
such as this one are not easily accessible to students, and it is
hoped by this reviewer that other books of this nature will be
reprinted. The format of the book is good, the print is very
clear, the fifteen plates of illustrations are excellent, and the
index is adequate.
RUDOLPH L. BIESELE
The University of Texas
The War of 1812. By Francis F. Beirne. New York (E. P. Dutton
& Co., Inc.), 1949. Pp. 410, with index and maps. $5.00oo.
As wars go, the War of 1812 has been considered strictly a
minor league affair. Beirne, associate editor of the Baltimore
Sun, has attempted to correct that point of view in The War of
z812, the first book on this subject since Lossing's Field Book
of the War of z812 in 1868. Beirne's thesis is that the War of
1812 is the initial stage in a logical sequence of historical events
in which World War I and World War II have been the suc-
ceeding affairs. Three times Europe has plunged into a general
war, and three times the United States has been drawn into the
melee. Of the three, the first stage was the most disastrous. Nev-
ertheless, from the disasters of the War of 1812, valuable lessons
can be learned. The dangers of unpreparedness, wishful think-
ing, and refusal to make individual sacrifices are just as impor-
tant in 1949 as in 1812.
Beirne graphically and entertainingly traces the progress of
the war from the disgraceful surrender of Detroit, the worst
military disgrace in American history until Pearl Harbor,
through the series of appalling defeats on the Canadian border
which reduced America's northern border to the Ohio River.
He sketches the disloyalty of the New England states and the

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 53, July 1949 - April, 1950. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101126/. Accessed July 29, 2014.