The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 53, July 1949 - April, 1950

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

sufficient economic unit. A lack of attentive management, floods,
and the boll weevil have contributed to the degeneration. "The
old house still stands at Laurel Hill, not yet deserted, but its
glories are departed."
The format is of the same excellent quality and attractive ap-
pearance that we have learned to expect from the Louisiana State
University Press.
JAMES H. MCLENDON
Mississippi State College
The Age of the Great Depression (A History of American Life,
Vol. XIII). By Dixon Wecter. New York (Macmillan), 1949.
Pp. xiv+434. $5.00.
Dixon Wecter is a graduate of Baylor and Oxford universities.
He has taught in Texas, Colorado, and California and has lec-
tured on American civilization in Illinois, Australia, and recently
in South American west coast countries. His fifth book in twelve
years, The Age of the Great Depression, is significant as the first
scholarly synthesis of American social history for the period be-
tween the initiation of the Depression and the national disaster
at Pearl Harbor. Excellence of style and a high order of research
have earned for the author the distinct honor of having his study
appear in the American Life Series, edited by Dr. A. M. Schles-
inger, and as a selection of the History Book Club.
Dr. Schlesinger's Introduction emphasizes the special attention
placed on human values. This volume surveys the constitutional
terms, along with the political and social philosophies, of Presi-
dents Herbert Hoover and Franklin D. Roosevelt. Readers will
be reminded that numerous roots of the New Deal sprouted in
the Hoover Era, becoming at times a jungle growth which was
cut away by actions of elder statesmen on the Supreme Court
until they incurred the wrath of President Roosevelt. By the
time the court became more amenable, the problems of foreign
affairs and global war were sending the domestic experiment into
an eclipse. The author is well aware that our domestic welfare
does not function in a tariff-sealed hemispheric vacuum. The
failures to solve economic problems, such as war debts by the
Hoover Moratorium or monetary questions by storing gold, re-

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 53, July 1949 - April, 1950. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101126/. Accessed June 2, 2015.