The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 54, July 1950 - April, 1951

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

Dr. Dale was born in Greer County, Texas (now in Okla-
homa), and has spent most of his life in the Southwest explor-
ing the country and learning about its peoples-Indians and
whites. He has served in the department of history in the Uni-
versity of Oklahoma since 1914, where he now is director of the
Frank Phillips Collection of Indian materials and research pro-
fessor of history.
The Indians of the Southwest is number twenty-eight in the
University of Oklahoma's Civilization of American Indian Series,
and is published in co-operation with the Huntington Library,
San Marino, California.
OHILAND MORTON
Edinburg Regional College
Persimmon Hill: A Narrative of Old St. Louis and the Far West.
By William Clark Kennerly. Edited by Elizabeth Russell.
Norman (University of Oklahoma Press), 1948. Illustrations.
Pp. xi+'73. $3.75.
In its announcement of this narrative the University of Okla-
homa Press says that the story would interest readers and "be
worthy of recommendation" to friends, a statement with which
I agree in all respects. My interest in the narrative was increased
by the fact that while I was reading the book last fall I was
traveling through St. Louis from Chicago to Salt Lake City and
saw some of the places and passed by others which are men-
tioned in this story.
In so far as William Clark Kennerly told the stories of this
book to his daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth Kennerly Russell, he is the
author of this book. Mrs. Russell, however, in putting the stories
into written form, is the editor and deserves considerable credit
for her work. For her it was a labor of love, and to the reading
public it is a work full of "important contributions to the his-
tory of the period, the middle third of the nineteenth century."
The family home, originally built by James Hancock Kennerly
and his wife, Elise Saugrain Kennerly, is the point around which
the stories revolve. Persimmon Hill, or Cote Plaquemine, as the
French-speaking people of St. Louis called the home, was visited
by many kinsmen and friends. General William Clark of the

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 54, July 1950 - April, 1951. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101133/. Accessed November 22, 2014.