The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 55, July 1951 - April, 1952

Book Reviews

of the legislature. So in 1848 the legislature passed a resolution
calling on Judge Watrous to resign. Judge Watrous naturally
and indignantly refused, but this was only the beginning of his
tribulations. Lawyers representing unsuccessful litigants in his
court went to Washington seeking Judge Watrous' impeachment,
making vicious attacks on his personal and official integrity and
honesty, with only the most trivial and irrelevant support in
the facts. The first attempt in 1852 was unsuccessful when the
House committee found no grounds for impeachment. In 1856
another unsuccessful litigant, one Simon Mussina, started a more
protracted and even more vindictive campaign for impeachment.
A major portion of Mr. Hawkins' book is taken up with the
story of this disgraceful attempt to punish a judge for his coura-
geous and conscientious judicial rulings. This effort, too, was
unsuccessful, but it left Watrous' reputation blackened and his
health ruined.
Mr. Hawkins has told his story well. The book is well docu-
mented and indexed; and it is handsomely illustrated, printed,
and bound. It is a matter of deep regret that Mr. Hawkins'
untimely death has cut short a productive career of legal
scholarship.
JAMES P. HART
The University of Texas
Texas and Its Revolution. By Frederic Leclerc. Translated from
the original French by James L. Shepherd III. Houston
(The Anson Jones Press), 1950. Pp. 149. Large 8 vo. map,
facsims.
In his preface the translator traces the bibliography of this
work. It was first published in La Revue de Deux Mondes
(Paris), for March and April, 1840; the first page of the article
is reproduced in facsimile (p. 99). Next a translation from the
French, by "a Gentleman of Philadelphia," pseudonym used by
Benjamin Franklin French, appeared in the Southern Literary
Messenger (Richmond, Virginia) for May and June, 1841.
Meanwhile Dr. Leclerc issued his book in Paris; a facsimile of
the title page is given on page 45.
Dr. Leclerc was young, educated, alert, and interested in his

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 55, July 1951 - April, 1952. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101139/. Accessed May 26, 2015.