The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 55, July 1951 - April, 1952

Notes and Documents

eCeral Yse 6Maria Yesus Carabaial
A N article entitled "The Carvajal Disturbances" in the
October, 1951, Quarterly caused the writer to review
notes accumulated through the years having to do with
the picturesque and human story of Jos6 Maria J. Carbajal, the
San Antonio lad who was educated by Alexander Campbell and
who eventually became General of Division in the Mexican army
and Benito Juirez' confidential agent to money lenders of the
United States.
The writer had supposed that Jose Maria was a son of Nicolas
Carabajal, who was granted land in the Refugio area by the
ayuntamiento of Goliad before the General Colonization Law
of Coahuila and Texas was in effect. This was a mistake. Nicolas
Carabajal could not have been the father of Jose Maria, who was
a lad of twelve or thirteen years, living in the family of his
widowed mother at San Antonio when he won the friendship
of Stephen F. Austin and later of Littleberry Hawkins during
the winter of 1822-1823. Records of the Mission Refugio show
that Nicolas Carabajal and his wife, Catarina Falcon, were the
parents of Maria Gertrudis Ynes Carbajal, baptized at the Mission
of Refugio in 181o and sponsors of other children baptized at
Mission Refugio in 1810o and 1811. But Maria Catarina Falcon,
aged about twenty-seven, died and was buried at this mission in
1812. Mission burial records identify her as the wife of Nicolas
Carabajal. Manuela Carabajal, not otherwise identified, was spon-
sor of an infant baptized at the mission in 1827.1 Since married
women usually appear in Spanish church records under their own
family names rather than under the names of their husbands,
Manuela was probably a daughter of Nicolds Carabajal rather
than his second wife.
Dolores Carabajal, widow, applied for land in the colony of
James Power and James Hewetson as head of a family in 1834.
This was one of the applications left unfinished because of the
1W. H. Oberste, History of Refugio Mission (Refugio, 1942), 386-392.


Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 55, July 1951 - April, 1952. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. Accessed November 26, 2015.