The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 56, July 1952 - April, 1953

Book Reviews

any amount is distracting from a text which is not burdened
with clarity or reader interest.
The general appearance of the book is excellent and harmo-
nizes with the subject matter: cover sketch, color scheme, end
pieces, type, and bond evidence the artistic touch inserted by the
University of Florida Press. And the proofreading is generally
good, excepting the translations, as noted. The few slips of gram-
mar which invariably creep in need not be detailed here. A ques-
tion arises, however, in regard to the rule which the authors
followed in accenting Spanish words. Though San Augustin [sic],
for example, is religiously marked, words like Sebastian, Angel,
Alvarez, Diaz, Andres, Garcia, and Joachin were left undressed.
It is not pleasant to dissect a work which undoubtedly repre-
sents painstaking research performed by skilled specialists; but
the potential value of Here They Once Stood will be dissipated
because of important omissions and the method of presentation.
The "casual reader" will be frightened away quickly, and the
searching scholar will become exasperated. It is axiomatic that
writers should consider the reader.
FRANK A. KNAPP, JR.
Economic Resources and Policies of the South. By Calvin B.
Hoover and B. U. Ratchford. New York (The Macmillan
Company), 1951. Pp. 464. $5.50.
Ever since the South was branded as the number one economic
problem of the nation, many Southerners have desired to do some-
thing to remedy the situation. This volume is a first step toward
substituting intelligent investigation for the wailing wall or de-
fensive apology. The National Planning Association indicated
an interest in an analysis of economic policies for the South. It
was soon evident that the first need was adequate information
on the economic resources of the South. Therefore, approximate-
ly two-thirds of this study is devoted to a presentation of the
economic resources and the remainder to the analysis of policies,
proposed and otherwise, that will give the maximum benefits in
terms of better living for Southerners.
The first two chapters analyze the resources, human and phys-
ical; the third, income; the fourth discussses barriers to economic

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 56, July 1952 - April, 1953. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101145/. Accessed April 16, 2014.