The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 56, July 1952 - April, 1953

Book Reviews

springs, and water holes mentioned in the various diaries, jour-
nals, and printed accounts have been identified by Professor
Carroll, the trail finder. In only a comparatively few instances
was the author forced to resort to the use of such words as
"probably," "perhaps," "logical guess," "indeterminate," "ap-
proximation," or other indefinite terms.
The Texan Santa Fe Trail is a scholarly work of precision as
opposed to the novel or dramatic production. It is, however,
definitely interesting to read. Those who are unfamiliar with the
fate of the members of the Texan Santa Fe Expedition may read
here select extracts from all the major accounts. Those who are
familiar only with the classic account by Kendall may again
take up the trail with Gallagher, Hoyle, Falconer, and Grover,
camp with them under the stars, share their homesickness with
them at Camp Resolution, thrill with them at the beauty of some
of the unexplored country which they crossed, and witness with
regret the foul treason of one of their own number which led
to the capture of the entire party.
Errata were detected in only a few instances. The illustrations
add color; the maps give clarity; the appendix gives the student
an entirely new account in the first printing of the Peter
Gallagher Diary; and the complete index makes the book usable.
The reviewer would brand this one "a contribution" to the his-
tory of Texas and the Southwest.
CLAUDE ELLIOTT
Southwest Texas State Teachers College
The Petroleum Dictionary. By Lalia Phipps Boone. Norman
(University of Oklahoma Press), 1952. Pp. xiii + 338. $5.oo.
The scope of The Petroleum Dictionary is set out on the jacket:
"More than 6ooo entries . definitions of technical and everyday
expressions . a comprehensive guide to the language of the oil
industry." Considering the trades and the professions, the arts
and the sciences, the thousands of people and the great areas
that make up this tremendous business, the author has under-
taken a stupendous task.
Traders (brokers, lease grafters, wildcat promoters, coyotes)
and laborers (roughnecks, roustabouts, scissor-bills). have perhaps
contributed most of the pithy and characteristic expressions to

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 56, July 1952 - April, 1953. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101145/. Accessed July 29, 2014.