The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 56, July 1952 - April, 1953

Book Reviews

of venal agents and traders; of Indian raids and prolonged wars
in Texas, Kansas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California; and
of the rise, development, and inadequacies of the Indian reserva-
tion system. The concluding chapter is a summary of the events
within the western scene on the eve of the Civil War.
At best, a book which encompasses so wide a range of subject
matter can be but a synthesis of what many other writers have
done, but this is a good one. The subject's enormous frame is
indicated by the index listing of eighty forts which are men-
tioned or discussed in the narrative, of numerous expeditions
which crossed and crisscrossed the country, and of many Indian
tribes and their relations with white men. Obviously, in the
fitting of these numerous mosaic units within his large pattern,
the author has made occasional slips. For example, he speaks of
"forts across northern Texas from the Red River to the Rio
Grande," of the "northern outbound Marcy trail of 1849," of
the Chisholm Trail running along the North Canadian River,
and still others. One would wonder, too, just how Fort Arbuckle,
Indian Territory, would protect immigrants.
But such slips do not detract from the book's general merits.
Professor Bender's synthesis is excellent, his documentation full,
his bibliography exhaustive. His study is the best general coverage
of the army and the southwestern frontier which this reviewer
has seen.
CARL COKE RISTER
Texas Technological College
Military Life in Dakota: The Journal of Philippe Rdgis de
Trobriand. Translated and edited from the French original
by Lucile M. Kane. St. Paul (Alvord Memorial Commission
of the Mississippi Valley Historical Association), 1951.
Pp. xxv+395. $7.50.
Lucile M. Kane has given us an excellent translation of a
French aristocrat who describes life at Fort Stevenson in the
District of Dakota in 1867-187o. De Trobriand was also an artist,
as is evidenced by the illustrations used in the book.
Descendant of a long line of distinguished soldiers, Baron de
Trobriand studied law in France and was admitted to the bar

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 56, July 1952 - April, 1953. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101145/. Accessed July 11, 2014.