The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 58, July 1954 - April, 1955

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

price, and at the kind of publisher: a university press. The
splendid idea can be exploited later by another writer.
FULMER MOOD
The University of Texas
Apache Vengeance. By Jess G. Hayes. Albuquerque (University
of Mexico Press), 1954. Pp. xx+185. $3.50.
Apparently the only objectivity we humans seem able to attain
in regard to social and political relations is through time and,
possibly, space-though today it would probably have to be inter-
planetary space. Time has given us a more nearly objective ap-
proach to our contact with the American Indian of the last cen-
tury. A number of recent books dealing with this problem are
even critical of the role played by the United States, both the
government and the people. To mention but two of these vol-
umes: there is the dramatic and moving account of the flight of
the Cheyennes in Mari Sandoz's Cheyenne Autumn; and Paul
Wellman's disturbing Indian Wars of the West.
Apache Vengeance can also be included in this group, for
author Hayes sympathizes with the Apaches and several times
reminds the reader that it might be our unfair treatment of these
Indians which forced them into the role of renegades. This is
especially true of his account of Apache Kid, whose story is the
major interest of this book.
At eighteen "The Kid" was a trusted sergeant of scouts who
had already killed more than twenty of his people in attempting
to return them to "white justice." He had an uncanny tracking
ability and seldom failed in locating a runaway member of his
race. "Even Geronimo and Ma-si, on various occasions, were
located by him." (p. 3.) Yet two years later Apache Kid was a
hated and hunted outlaw. The circumstances surrounding this
change are the central theme of this book.
Hayes has done a thorough job: he has data, details, footnotes,
and nine short appendices, but no index. The book is interesting,
well written, but lacks warmth, aliveness, the humanness of
Cheyenne Autumn, where one is emotionally moved and dis-
turbed. Apache Vengeance is analytical, factual. It has skeleton
and framework, but it lacks the breath of life. Despite this, the

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 58, July 1954 - April, 1955. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101158/. Accessed December 27, 2014.