The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 59, July 1955 - April, 1956

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

Cattleman, which quickly became a standard work on the cattle
industry in the northern plains country. Now a quarter of a
century later, with the book long out of print, the University of
Minnesota Press has re-issued the book. It is almost entirely a
second printing, nothing more--same preface, same contents, same
bibliography. As such it will undoubtedly satisfy a demand among
those persons interested in the complete story of either the cattle
industry or the West, and who realize that their story isn't com-
plete without Osgood's work.
The emphasis is economic. The presentation is straightforward
and unromantic. The book was sound twenty-five years ago; noth-
ing has been turned up in the interim to make it any less sound.
The first two chapters concern themselves with the Texas and
Southwest picture, and other scattered references to Texas occur
throughout. As indicated in the first sentence of this review, it is
a basic book about an industry that may have modified its shape
but that is still vital to Texas and the West.
JOE B. FRANTZ
The University of Texas
The Butterfield Overland Mail. By Waterman L. Ormsby. Edited
by Lyle H. Wright and Josephine M. Bynum. San Marino,
California (The Huntington Library), 1954. Pp. 172. Illus-
trations. $4.00.
This is the welcome reissue of a title first published by the
Huntington Library in 1942. No change has been made in the
text. Ormsby's narratives very acceptably supplement the splendid
and exhaustive study of the Butterfield stage line published by
Roscoe P. Conkling and Margaret B. Conkling (The Butterfield
Overland Mail, 1857-1869, two volumes and atlas, Glendale, 1947).
Ormsby was the sole through passenger on the first westbound
mail stage, which left Tipton, Missouri, on September 16 and
arrived at San Francisco on October lo, 1858. His narratives
promptly appeared in the New York Herald, of which newspaper
he was a special correspondent.
The present publication contains an informative introduc-
tion, numerous helpful notes, and an index. Serving as frontis-
piece is a copy of the earliest known "Through Time Schedule"

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 59, July 1955 - April, 1956. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101162/. Accessed July 29, 2014.