The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 59, July 1955 - April, 1956

Book Reviews

earlier. Readers are reminded that Texas was one of only seven
states giving John C. Breckinridge a popular majority in 186o,
even though the Kentuckian's electoral total was impressive in
that critical year. 'Texas' 33.4 per cent support of the Know Noth-
ings in 1856 stands in contrast with neighboring Louisiana's 48.3
per cent, and the comparison is provocative in the light of Sam
Houston's attitude toward the Fillmore-Donelson ticket. It will
not be news to Texans that the "unreconstructed" Lone Star State
took no part in the Grant-Seymour contest. But the substantial
1888 Union Labor party vote in Texas may prove surprising to
non-specialists.
It is good to find Mr. Burnham paying attention to C. Vann
Woodward's Reunion and Reaction in his treatment of 1876 and
1877. He might have proceeded a little farther along the course
charted by Professor Woodward, devoting several paragraphs to
county-by-county reflections of President Hayes's address to win
southern backing for the Republican party. The author seems to
imply (page 139) that Benjamin F. Butler was the Greenback
presidential candidate in 188o (when James B. Weaver ran) as
well as in 1884.
But enough of adverse criticism. The book is first-rate. Com-
pact and comprehensive, it will cause many Tribune Almanacs and
similar sources to gather dust out in the stacks. Henceforth, gen-
erations of students will be as deeply in debt to Mr. Burnham as
they long have been to Mr. Robinson. The painstaking labor,
the judgment, and the exhumations of the two resourceful com-
pilers have transformed what formerly could be a most exasperat-
ing chore into relief and pleasure for their fellow scholars.
HOLMAN HAMILTON
University of Kentucky
The Spanish Archives of the General Land Office of Texas. By
Virginia H. Taylor. Austin (Lone Star Press), 1955. Pp.
viii+258. Illustrations, maps, appendix, bibliography, and
index. $2o.oo.
Spanish and Mexican land grants constitute the basis of titles
to more than twenty-five million acres of land in Texas, a rather
peculiar circumstance which comes as a surprise to, most persons-

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 59, July 1955 - April, 1956. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101162/. Accessed December 19, 2014.