The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 59, July 1955 - April, 1956

Book Reviews

pendence; a busy oil field; a thoroughfare of a bustling, growing
metropolis; a shipwreck on the Coast; the complete quiet of siesta
time at Roma; or a Texan naval vessel cruising on the waters
of Yucatan.
The text and the sketches have a rich quality which springs
from their dignity, clarity, and sincerity. The Humble Oil &c
Refining Company, through the efforts of Mr. Fields and Mr.
Schiwetz, has made a distinct and valid contribution to Texana.
VERNA DECKERT
CLAUDE ELLIOTT
Southwest Texas State College
Rutherford B. Hayes and His America. By Harry Barnard. In-
dianapolis (The Bobbs-Merrill Company, Inc.), 1954. Pp.
6o6. Illustrations, index. $6.00.
For one of two reasons students of the Southwestern scene have
always had more than a passing interest in Rutherford B. Hayes:
he was a close personal friend of Texas' Guy M. Bryan for a half-
century, enough of a friend that not even the Civil War could
stem the flow of manly affection between the two men; and he
was for a while a key figure in the projection of the Texas and
Pacific Railroad westward.
Other than his Texas relationship Hayes has been remembered
chiefly as the man who "stole" the Election of 1876 from Samuel
Tilden by an 8-to-7 margin, as the President who officially ended
Reconstruction, and as a good man, albeit ineffective, in a gen-
eral picture of Radical Republican rascality following the Civil
War. Beyond that, he has fallen into the general stereotype that
pursues virtually every politician in the period between 1876 and
1900oo, the one period that at the moment cries more for fresh
re-examination than any other in American history.
Harry Barnard, who apparently is making a career out of
rescuing "forgotten" men from historical oblivion, has tried to
bring Hayes out of the shadows, invest him with life, and renew
interest in his career and his administration. Barnard definitely
succeeds in making a human being out of what had hardly been
more than a beard with a face behind it. Whether any amount of
re-evaluation, though, can make people want to know more about

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 59, July 1955 - April, 1956. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101162/. Accessed September 15, 2014.