The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 59, July 1955 - April, 1956

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

Stories of the Texas Rangers. By B. Roberts Lackey. San Antonio
(The Naylor Company), 1955. Pp. ix+ 1o5. Index.
A new book about the Texas Rangers usually finds a ready audi-
ence among readers who thrill to deeds of empire building. Un-
fortunately the book here reviewed offers nothing new to the his-
tory, methodology, or mythology of the Rangers. Every incident it
describes has been in print for more than forty years under the
title Rangers and Sovereignty by Captain Dan W. Roberts, printed
in San Antonio, Texas, by the Wood Printing and Engraving
Company in 1914.
Even the chapter headings of the two books indicate common
parentage. Fifteen of the headings in Stories of the Texas Rangers
are identical with a corresponding fifteen in Rangers and Sov-
ereignty. Furthermore, even where headings differ, each book
presents the same material in corresponding chapters. The sim-
ilarity suggested in the tables of contents reaches fruition in the
texts of the two volumes, where there are innumerable instances
of resemblance in words, phraseology, and sentences.
Limited space does not permit wide comparisons through par-
allel quotations, but perhaps one short passage will serve to indi-
cate that Stories of the Texas Rangers draws heavily upon Rangers
and Sovereignty for its content.
On page 7 of Mr. Lackey's book, it is stated: "Captain Dan's
connection with the Ranger Battalion was accidental. That is
true, at least to the extent that he made no application to enlist
in the service."
Captain Roberts has this to say on page 33 of his book: "My
connection with the Ranger Battalion was accidental. That is true
at least to the extent that I made no application to enlist in the
service."
This single example could be duplicated on most of the pages
in Stories of the Texas Rangers. In fact, one who has read Rangers
and Sovereignty has already read Stories of the Texas Rangers
and, furthermore, has had the advantage of receiving informa-
tion in first person rather than in third. The best that can be said
for the newer volume is that it is a paraphrase of the older-a
close paraphrase.
At this point it should be noted that while Stories of the Texas

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 59, July 1955 - April, 1956. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101162/. Accessed July 25, 2014.