The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 59, July 1955 - April, 1956

Book Reviews

plan depends upon the influence of Regional Council members
in either the United States Senate or State Senates.
By this plan, then, Kraenzel hopes to secure the flexibility, mo-
bility, and reserves that will enable a successful transition on the
Great Plains.
DAN FARLOW
Adobe Walls Bride. By John L. McCarty. San Antonio (The
Naylor Company), 1955. Pp. xi+281. Illustrations. $3.50.
Adobe Walls Bride is the story of a romance of two Virginians
enacted on the plains of West Texas. Billy Dixon, the hero of the
story, wandered out into the Southwest when it was an Indian-
buffalo country. The wildness of the West appealed to his adven-
turous spirit. As an Indian scout and buffalo hunter he roamed
the open plains and gave free rein to his love of adventure. After
the Indians were driven off the Plains, Dixon settled down and
established bachelor's quarters on Bent Creek near the site of the
famous Adobe Walls battle of 1874 in which he took a leading
part. This camp was later to be his first home. Here he began
to be transformed from a wandering scout to a home-loving
citizen,.
Some years later, Olive King, whose family traditions were
deeply rooted in Virginia soil, found her way to the Texas Pan-
handle. She became one of the first school teachers in the region
near the site of the Adobe Walls fight. It was here along the dim
trails of the Canadian River Valley that these two Virginians met,
courted, fell in love, married, and established one of the first
homes in the Texas Panhandle.
Much of the pioneer work of Billy Dixon had been completed
while Olive King was yet a small child living in Montgomery,
Alabama, with an aunt who was steeped in the customs of the
home life of the Old South. Dixon had fought in the battles of
Adobe Walls and Buffalo Wallow in 1874, and had helped to
select the site for the location of Fort Elliott which was established
in 1875. Indeed, he was a seasoned veteran of the frontier when
Olive King arrived in Texas.
The heroic achievements of Billy Dixon first attracted the at-
tention and later embraced the affections of Olive King. He was

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 59, July 1955 - April, 1956. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101162/. Accessed August 30, 2014.