The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 59, July 1955 - April, 1956

Book Reviews

Texas History Theses. A Check List of the Theses and Disserta-
tions Relating to Texas History Accepted at The University
of Texas, 1893-1951. Compiled and edited by H. Bailey
Carroll and Milton R. Gutsch. Austin (The Texas State His-
torical Association), 1955. Pp. xiii+20o8. $5.oo.
Theses on Texas History. A Check List of Theses and Disserta-
tions in Texas History Produced in the Departments of
History of Eighteen Texas Graduate Schools and Thirty-
Three Graduate Schools Outside Texas, 1907-1952. Compiled
and edited by Claude Elliott. Austin (The Texas State His-
torical Association), 1955. Pp. xi+280. $5.00.
Since The Johns Hopkins University launched the first grad-
uate program in this country, no field of verbal research has ex-
panded faster than bibliography. New areas have been opened
each year; new techniques of bibliographical record, analysis,
and publication have been devised; new aids to the advancement
of scholarship have been discovered. Here are two volumes which
open one more domain with a remarkably thorough method of
record. By each volume the study of Texas will certainly be ad-
vanced.
A term often used-and misused-in connection with the re-
search projects of graduate students is "contribution to knowl-
edge." During the past quarter-century it has become increasingly
evident that much research must make its contribution in concert
with other similar studies. Not mere weight of massed words, but
increased meaning of subtle relationships, variations, contradic-
tions, and confirmations in related studies will, indeed, advance
the search for truth. These volumes show how. They also suggest
how the social sciences and humanities may benefit from the fully
analytical check list of graduate studies on a specific subject.
Some time ago the public prints considered it clever to quote
funny-sounding titles of theses and dissertations-presumably to
imply that graduate students and their professors must be fools
to be concerned with the legs of an insect or the minutiae of
the well-forgotten past. This appeal to verbal unfamiliarity (or
meaning muddled by being put out of scholarly context) is no
longer funny to "popular" editors, for research became fashion-
able when the weekly newsmagazines and the biggest industries

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 59, July 1955 - April, 1956. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101162/. Accessed December 25, 2014.