The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 61, July 1957 - April, 1958

Book Reviews

the first thirty years of the existence of Texas Technological Col-
lege. Occasional humor and bits of human interest seep into the
account in spots. Alumni, students, and faculty of the school will
doubtless find material of personal interest in The First Thirty
Years, for the book is written entirely about and for them. The
volume has value as a segment of local history.
The First Thirty Years is divided into three books. The first
book is concerned with a general history of the school from the
time of its opening in September, 1925, until the present. Em-
phasis is given to the career of each of the college presidents.
Book II deals at length with the development chronologically of
the divisions of Agriculture, Arts and Sciences, Engineering,
Home Economics, the Graduate School, Business Administration,
Extension, and Reserve Officers Training Corps. Book III presents
a description of student activities including their religious life,
organizations, the Student Union, the college newspaper, the
yearbook, and lastly the traditions of the school. Included in the
volume are numerous illustrations, a lengthy appendix, and com-
plete indices. W. C. NuNN
Texas Christian University
William Bollaert's Texas. Edited by W. Eugene Hollon and Ruth
Lapham Butler. Norman (University of Oklahoma Press),
1956. Pp. xiii+423. Map, illustrations, and index. $5.0o.
Researchers in Republic of Texas history have long felt it nec-
essary to trek to The Newberry Library in Chicago to consult the
William Bollaert Papers before turning loose the results of their
particular studies. The trip to Chicago might be time-consuming
and expensive, but few subjects in the Republic period could be
claimed as definitive until the writings of Bollaert had been
Now, thanks to The Newberry Library and the University of
Oklahoma Press, that trip can be made either for the cost of
gasoline to the nearest library or for an outlay of $5 at your
favorite book store. Now, too, the upcoming generation of
Republic historians can see why formerly the fledgling author
who spread his wings without having visited the Bollaert Papers
never quite felt free in his academic conscience.


Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 61, July 1957 - April, 1958. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. Accessed November 29, 2015.