The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 63, July 1959 - April, 1960

Zexas Callectoil
H. BAILEY CARROLL
EWIS RANDOLPH BRYAN, JR., a distinguished Texan and a
splendidly unselfish and public-spirited member of the
Association, died in Houston on January 30, 1959. Bryan
was a distinguished son of the historic Bryan family of Texas.
He had just completed a term as president of the Philosophical
Society of Texas, and was president of the San Jacinto Museum
of History Association at the time of his death. Until recently
he had been president of the Bank of the Southwest of Hous-
ton, which institution he continued to serve as vice-chairman
of the board.
His fellow townsmen and friend, George Carmack, editor of
the Houston Press, recorded the loss of Randolph Bryan in his
paper of January 31:
L. R. Bryan, Jr.
Texas is not-as some of its critics would have the world believe
-a flamboyant region best characterized by the cheap "Texas Brag."
Texas is a state of genuineness-of the proper appreciation of tra-
dition and culture-of patriotism to community, to state and to na-
tion-of accomplishment in both matters of business and industry and
matters of spirit.
Just as had his family before him-dating back to Moses Austin
and Stephen F. Austin-Randolph Bryan, who died yesterday repre-
sented all the fine things that fundamentally make up Texas and
true Texans.
As was to be expected of a man of his background, Randolph
Bryan was always interested in Texas history.
Working through one of the major interests of his life, the San
Jacinto Museum, he probably has done as much as any man not only
to preserve the proper mementos of Texas' past but to create a love
of Texas history in the minds and hearts of Texans. San Jacinto
Museum is a relatively small museum, but one of genuine worth. To
Randolph Bryan goes a large share of the credit for the museum
having that worth.
Through the Texas Philosophical Society, historical societies, patri-
otic organizations and particularly through his own personal work,

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 63, July 1959 - April, 1960. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101186/. Accessed December 29, 2014.