The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 63, July 1959 - April, 1960

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ILIETORS.
5, 1836.
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their spies, which put our side in possession of
all information relative to Santa Anna's move-
ments. Hostbn resolved to encounter him at
Harrisburgh, but on reaching that place, they
ascertained that he had gone to Washington.-
Houston left his sick and baggage in charge of'
three hundred men, and by a forel march of
thirty-five miles, came up with the enemy-his
cavalry commenced and sustained the battle, un-
supported by either the artillery oir infantry, for
ht'an hour, and retreated in good order, without
the loss of a man. Both armies passed the night
in hearing of each other. The following simple
draft will show the positions of the two armies.
- 1. Texan Camp.

2. Mexican do.
8. A deep Bayou.
4. A Bridye, burnt by or-
der of Gen. Houston
the morning of the bat-
tie.
5. A Creek running from
Bufthlo Bayou to a
swamp.
6. An Impassible swamp.
7. A grove of trees.

S

8. Buffalo Bayou.
During the night Gen. Cos joined Santa Anna
with a reinforcement of five hundred men. The
following morning the bridge was burnt by order
of Gen. Houston, which left the defeated party
wholly at the mercy of" the other. The attack
was ordered ii three divisions, at 4 o'clock.--
They charged into the Mexican camp amidst a
shower of grape and musketry, which they re-
turned with rifle balls so warmly, that the Mexi-
cans threw down their arms, and begged for
quarter. A most sanguinary scene followed;
the exasperated Texans cried "Fannin and the
. . . , a . . . ,

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A sketch of the San Jacinto Battlefield that appeared in the Daily Commercial
Advertiser (Buffalo, New York), June 15, 1836. The sketch, which shows the
relative positions of the opposing forces, accompanied an account that was
written from Texas by Horace P. Chamberlain to his father in Buffalo.

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 63, July 1959 - April, 1960. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101186/. Accessed August 21, 2014.