The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 65, July 1961 - April, 1962

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

Letter from the Texas Steessioi Co#enetio, 1861:
Willard RichardsoHt to ieorge Ware FultoH
Edited by A. RAY STEPHENS
W ILLARD RICHARDSON, although not the first editor of the
Galveston News, was its true founder. When he took
the editorship in 1843, the paper was less than one year
old and tottering on the brink of ruin, the fate that many early
Texas newspapers met. Within two years, Richardson became
owner as well as editor, and the Galveston News became the most
influential of all newspapers in the new state of Texas. The News
continued under Richardson's tutelage until his death in 1875.
One of the great achievements of Richardson and his staff was
the publishing of The Texas Almanac beginning in 1857. The
Almanac served as a yearbook for the state, to report the material
and social progress made in Texas year by year, as well as serving
the role of a history textbook and encyclopedia on Texas. Rich-
ardson was an opponent of Sam Houston and denounced him in
many editorial comments while Houston was President of the
Republic, United States Senator, and Governor of Texas, espe-
cially the latter position because the two took disparate stands on
the subject of secession, as the letter below shows.
Richardson was born in Massachusetts in 18o2, but soon forsook
his native New England for the tidewater region of South Caro-
lina. After attending college in his new home state, he taught
school for nine years before he moved to Texas in 1837. Richard-
son became an employee of the Republic of Texas and one of his
positions was that of surveyor. George Ware Fulton, a leader of a
volunteer group from Vincennes, Indiana, which came in 1836
to fight for Texas independence, worked with Richardson on the
surveying of Live Oak Peninsula in the late 1830's, and an endur-
ing friendship was born. When Fulton moved to. Maryland in
1846 and later lived in Ohio, he and Richardson continued their
warm relationship through correspondence. Although Fulton later
returned to Texas and became a cattle baron in San Patricio and

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 65, July 1961 - April, 1962. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101195/. Accessed March 31, 2015.