The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 65, July 1961 - April, 1962

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

Mary . OAK#s's JOurlfaf of /ltaHCal
&xploratis i Zrans-Pecos Cexas,
4Aqust-Septider, 1914
Edited by
B. C. THARP and CHESTER V. KIELMAN
[The following is a continuation of the Mary S. Young Journal,
the first section of which appeared in the January, 1962, Quarterly.]
AUGUST 19
Balaam scratched her shoulder some way, and the flies got at it.
It was an ugly sore, so we gave her a light pack, and put most on
Nebuchadnezzar. Burros are interesting personalities. They are al-
ways revealing depths of character that you never dreamed were
there. They are like the fascinatingly mysterious heroines in the
story books. When our two darlings were nearly ready, Balaam sud-
denly, but with deliberate intent, fell over on her side. We thought
she had a giddy spell caused by her wound- (tho she did not look
faint) but when Nebuchadnezzar, seeing her, deliberately followed
her example, we decided differently. I expected all the way home
that Nebuchadnezzar would decide to fall over in the middle of the
stream, but he didn't. He really behaved very well and we got home
in good time.
Carey had to go to the ranch for chrysalic [cresylic] ointment" for
Balaam, but waited till after dinner. In the meantime after much
tribulations he succeeded in drawing the oblique-rectangular paral-
lelopiped figure-that abomination of a figure, that, when it is drawn
right always looks wrong. He rode Nebuchadnezzar, who at first
refused to leave his friend and companion Balaam. Whether this is
an admirable quality in burros or not I don't know. Was he showing
his depth of affection for her when he jerked at his rope and tried
to go to her? Did he sympathize with her in her affliction? After he
did get started Carey found out some more things about burros. He
learned what part of a burro's back you should not sit on. He learned
that when Nebuchadnezzar suddenly stopped and put his head be-
tween his front legs. I spent my day chiefly in picking out weavels
43A standard contemporary farm and ranch remedy for screw worms. The spelling
of this word, doubtless here encountered for the first and only time by Miss Young,
was probably suggested by Carey Tharp, to whom its use but not its spelling was
familiar.

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 65, July 1961 - April, 1962. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101195/. Accessed December 25, 2014.