The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 66, July 1962 - April, 1963

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

Association on April 26, 27, and 28 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin,
David D. Van Tassel from the University of Texas spoke on "Social
Science, Education, and the 'New Age of Collectivism': the A. H.
A. Commission on the Social Studies in the Schools," and Ben
H. Procter of Texas Christian University spoke on "A Step Toward
Progressivism: John H. Reagan's Fight for Railroad Regulation,
1857-87."
The Southern Historical Association held its annual meeting
on November 9, 1o, and i1, 1961, in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Two
papers were presented at that time on Texas: Alfred B. Thomas
of the University of Alabama spoke on "Texas and the Mission
Country," and Thomas A. Belser of Auburn spoke on "The Sig-
nificance of the Trans-Mississippi West during the Civil War."
Speakers from Texas on subjects outside the field of Texas history
were J. Harry Bennett, William R. Braisted, Thomas F. McGann,
and R. Davis Bitton of the University of Texas; Edwin A. Miles
and Robert V. Haynes of the University of Houston; Everette
Swinney of Southwest Texas State Teachers College; George
Wolfskill of Arlington State College; and C. Wentz Fehrenbach of
Tarleton State College.
C. Vann Woodward, who was recently appointed to the faculty
of Yale University after a number of years at Johns Hopkins
University, spent ten days during March in the Archives of the
University of Texas Library and the Archives of the Texas State
Library. Professor Woodward was occupied with research for a
general history of Reconstruction in the South.
Through the interest of Joe B. Frantz, chairman of the depart-
ment of history at the University of Texas, the Association received
the following letter from Edwin A. Bonewitz of Houston:
My studies relating to the early history of Houston, and to those
persons associated with it, have incited a special interest in John Aus-
tin since, as I am sure you know, it was upon a small portion of his
two-league grant of land from the Mexican government in 1824 that
the townsite of Houston was established by A. C. and J. K. Allen in the
year of 1836. Further, since John Austin died of the cholera which
visited Brazoria County in 1833, that epidemic has also become a

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 66, July 1962 - April, 1963. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101196/. Accessed September 2, 2014.