The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 66, July 1962 - April, 1963

Camp Ford

walked too near the dead line. The discharge from Smith's weapon
struck both men, and one of them, Private Thomas Moorehead,
Company I, died on the following day. According to one of the
prisoners, the culprit "was placed under guard, and the com-
mander, Colonel Allen, promised to turn him over to our troops,
but we learned afterwards that this was never done."" No fur-
ther incidents of this nature, however, occurred while Allen was
at Ford.
On Sunday, May 22, 1864, a sentry, reportedly of Anderson's
regiment, shot and killed Private John J. Calvert, Company K,
77th Ohio Infantry.57 The circumstances of the affair, which oc-
curred near the gate, are vague, and the motives assigned for
the guard's action are varied: he was merely practicing marksman-
ship; he wanted something to boast about; he was being cursed
by Calvert; or he wanted revenge, having recognized Calvert
as one who had previously mistreated him when he was confined
in a Federal prison.58
Accounts by both Confederates and Federals agree that prisoner
Samuel O. Shoemaker, private in Company H, 13oth Illinois, was
in no way seeking trouble when he was killed a few weeks later
on July 12. Confederate Sergeant William W. Heartsill claimed
that the shot was fired by a soldier in Anderson's regiment who
was being cursed by one of the prisoners. Heartsill denounced
the incident as "the very cowardliest kind of murder," and
thought "it is a shame on the officers who will allow such outrite
murder to go unpunished."69
s6Testimony of Oscar G. Burch, House Committee Report No. 45, 40th Cong., Sd
Sess. (Serial No. 1391), 1051; Indiana, Adjutant General's Office, Report of the
Adjutant General of the State of Indiana (8 vols.; Indianapolis, 1865-1869), IV, 6o8.
See also New Orleans Daily True Delta, July 26, 1864, p. 1; Duganne, Twenty Months
in the Department of the Gulf, 330; testimony of Chris. Schmidt and James S.
Anderson, St. Louis, Missouri, November 7, 1868, House Committee Report No. 45,
40th Cong., 3d Sess. (Serial No. 1391), 1055, 1059.
57Heartsill, Fourteen Hundred and Ninety-one Days, 20o5; Ohio, Adjutant Gen-
eral's Office, Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio in the War of the
Rebellion, z86z1-866 (12 vols.; Cincinnati, 1886-1889), VI, 344-
5sBering and Montgomery, Forty-eighth Ohio, 168; Bringhurst and Swigart, Forty-
sixth Indiana, 128; Heartsill, Fourteen Hundred and Ninety-one Days, 20o5;
Duganne, Twenty Months in the Department of the Gulf, 413-414.
s9Heartsill, Fourteen Hundred and Ninety-one Days, to9, indicates that the wrong
man was shot. Bering and Montgomery, Forty-eighth Ohio, 168; Bringhurst and
Swigart, Forty-sixth Indiana, 128; Illinois Adjutant General, Report ... for the
Years I86z-z866, VI, 568.

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 66, July 1962 - April, 1963. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101196/. Accessed July 30, 2014.