The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 66, July 1962 - April, 1963

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

his interview of length with Genl. Jackson. You can judge of the
value of all this and take it for what it is worth.
My own opinion is that the reason Major Patton did not write
more fully and was not let into the import of the interview was
that Santa Anna asked nothing known until he could get home
and into power and then he will have the Treaty, whatever it was,
confirmed and promulgated to the world. The fact that Santa Anna
was sent home in a Government vessel and Mr. Wharton says that
Genl. Jackson gave the kindest assurances of friendship to our cause
and that nothing should be done to our prejudice induces a belief with
me that something definitive has been done and that we may hope
for a speedy adjustment of our matters.
It is well in the meantime to be on guard for we know not what
a day may bring forth. The Watchman, another vessel, is at the
mouth of the Brasos-three days later than our last advices from
Orleans, but we do now know what news is bro't by her. It will
be sent you by the earliest opportunity possible
It affords me great pleasure to hear of your convalescence and
I anticipate with satisfaction your speedy and entire restoration
of former health. Your friend,
GENL. A. S. JOHNSON SAM HOUSTON
COM'G T. ARMY
COLUMBIA TEXAS
GENERAL, 1st March 1837
Every exertion has been used to send out at least one hundred
men on the best horses which the country can afford. I have at
various times and at least a month since ordered no less than four
men to raise companies and as soon as it is done to report to the
commanding General forthwith for orders. A part of a company
has been raised at Brazoria and directed to proceed to the army,
but have not started as yet. I will continue my exertions and God
alone can give success. Today I have heard from camp that the In-
dians had made Treaties with the Mexicans for the first time. This
may be so. Had Deaf Smith24 when appointed by me for that pur-
pose proceeded forthwith to the Comanchees, and held the Treaty
as contemplated by us, I have no doubt but what our frontier would
have been in a very different situation from what it is at this time.
It would have turned the Indians upon those who are annoying us.
It was their intent to become friendly with us.
A recent arrival has come to the mouth of the Brazos but we
hear no additional news of interest. Enclosed you will receive the
remarks of the Bulletin with the special message of General Jackson
24Erastus Smith was captain of a company of Texas Rangers.

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 66, July 1962 - April, 1963. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101196/. Accessed July 12, 2014.