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The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 66, July 1962 - April, 1963

Diamond's Account of the Great Hanging

o'clock p.m. of said day you will execute the sentence of this Court,
by hanging the said E. Childs by the neck until he is dead.
Daniel Montague
Prest. Cit. Ct.
While sentence was being pronounced he remained quiet and
apparently unmoved by the solemn warning given him by the
venerable president. Like his brother, he remained true to the
oaths he had taken and refused to make any confession or state-
ments regarding the order, as he had been advised to do by many
of his fellow prisoners.
He was several years the junior of his brother, and a man de-
cidedly more affable and companionable. He was a man of strong
will, obstinate and unyielding when opposed, and dangerous
when angry. He appeared, as did his brother, to take no notice
of his critical situation until near the closing scene of his mortal
existence.
[TRIAL OF A. D. SCOTT]
THE PEOPLE CONSPIRACY AND
VERSUS INSURRECTION
A. D. SCOTT
THE PRESIDENT-A. D. Scott-You have been brought before this
Court charged with the crimes of conspiracy and insurrection. Are
you now ready to hear these charges read and defend yourself against
them?
ACCUSED. I am ready to be tried, though I have no defense to make.
After the reading of the charges and questions as to his guilt or
innocence, he said:
I belonged to a secret order known by its members as a Union party.
I know of no other object than that we were to fight for the Union, &
in doing so, were to take possession of the country, and kill those at
home who did not favor our purpose, as I stated in my evidence on the
trial of Dr. Henry Childs.
I engaged generally in the meetings and took part in the business
of the Order generally. My understanding was that we were to resist
the Conscript law, and all laws passed by Confederate authority. I do
not know what was the object or intention of others, only as I ob-
tained information on the subject of the order in our meetings. I re-
ceived the signs, grip and password. This is all I know in regard to the
Order. And if I am judged guilty by these statements, why, then I am

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 66, July 1962 - April, 1963. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101196/. Accessed September 30, 2014.