The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 66, July 1962 - April, 1963

Diamond's Account of the Great Hanging

391

same time, he swore in P Q Russell, Wm Anderson,64 George Ander-
son, John Tourly, and Richard Anderson.
E. F. Anderson sworn.
[WITNESS.] I know of a secret organization in this country. The
prisoner, Wm Lock, told me it was to afford us protection when the
Northern Army should come in. Mr. Lock gave me the signs, grip, and
password. Lock told me that we were to get powder at Sherman.
The design of the organization, was the reconstruction of the old
Constitution, and Union.
THE PRISONER. Jackson Mount swore me and I swore him into this
organization. I introduced the password "Arizina," and the signs, and
grips of the order. Mount and myself were the first starters of this
order. I have heard that there was an organization to break up both
armies. I have heard since that it was the same as this; and that the
signs and password would protect us when the Northern army come.
Mount and myself took two oaths. We were to kill, or assist in kill-
ing, every man who should reveal either the existence of the order or
its plans and designs. I advised my men, (Lock had a company,) not
to go to the war.
Dr Eli Thomas sworn.
[WITNESS.] In a conversation with the prisoner last night (in per-
son) I made a clean breast of the whole matter. Lock said he had
scruples about doing so himself, on account of the oaths he had taken
in the order.
He was found guilty and hung.
After he was condemned, his fellow prisoners urged him to
confess his guilt and make a clean breast of it, as most of them
had done. He was sufficiently wrought upon to induce him to send
for a minister of the Gospel to advise him in the matter. He sent
for the Rev. Wm. Hamill and the Rev Mr Barrett, both members
of the Jury. He laid before [them] the oaths he had taken, his
action under them already developed, and the state of his mind
in reference to a revelation of all the plans and designs of the
"Order."
They assured him that they did not desire to sit upon such a
delicate question; it being as far from their wish, as from their
64A "William Anderson," twenty-seven-year-old farmer born in Tennessee, is listed
in the U. S. Eighth Census, 186o (Returns of Schedule 1, Free Inhabitants, for Cooke
County, Texas, microfilm, Dallas Public Library).

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 66, July 1962 - April, 1963. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101196/. Accessed September 22, 2014.